Skip to content

Recent Articles

3
Jun

free screenplay contest relaunches with audience voting

Write Club ChallengeAfter a fifteen month hiatus (lots of writing, and a new sister site launched), Write Club Challenge is back with a new look, and a new model.

Yes, we’re still offering free screenplay contests.

Yes, the rules remain the same: write fast, stick to the rules.

Yes, the prize is still bragging rights (with the occasional exception).

What is Write Club Challenge?

Just to recap, we offer free screenwriting contests — what we call challenges — with strict themes, subject restrictions, and short timelines.

We’ve had respected script analysts and recognized actors referee our challenges.

And we’ve had prizes (and kind support) from the Shriekfest Film Festival and BOSI and SONY.

And now we’ve relaunched!

What’s  changed?

We’ve got a fancy new look.

You must be a member of Write Club Challenge to submit an entry to a challenge.

Now we’re offering Popular Vote challenges, where your entries are voted on by visitors to the blog … high score wins. Don’t worry, we’ll still run Refereed challenges too, with industry pro judges.

What now?

Join Write Club Challenge.

Follow us on Twitter.

Follow our RSS.

We’ll let you know when there’s a new challenge afoot.

6
Jan

screenplay contest winner announced

Winner of unofficial Paranormal Activity screenplay challenge announced.

paranormal-activity-movie-poster1Well, we’ve struggled with some technical issues (why oh why do hackers think we want a flaming skull on our homepage?) but we’ve finally got control of the site back, and we can announce the (belated) winner of our second screenplay writing challenge: The End.

As a reminder, we asked you to submit your best shot at rewriting the ending of 2009′s most successful horror film, Paranormal Activity. Our referee was the awesome Denise Gossett, scream queen and founder of the Shriekfest Film Festival.

So who took the prize?

Congratulations go to: Carlos Perez – for his “Goodnight” entry.

Carlos wins a Shriekfest t-shirt, a free 200 word ad in the Shriekfest newsletter (he can use it to pimp his film, screenplay, writing services, etc), a link on the Shriekfest site, and a free festival pass for 2010 Fest. Sweet, right?

Here’s his entry (and then here’s the page with all the entries):

INT. KATIE AND MICAH’S BEDROOM – VIDEO CAMERA POV. – EVE.

Micah and Katie are asleep in bed. The footsteps of the apparition are heard entering the bedroom. The covers over Katie are slowly pulled back from off of her. Invisible hands grab her hands and pull her from the bed and out toward the doorway.

Katie SCREAMS out for help and Micah hears her. He quickly jumps out of bed and tries to pull her back into the room, but the apparition’s strength is too strong and Katie is pulled out of the doorway and into the hall.

Micah rushes after her, into the darkness.

There is a scuffle from downstairs followed by a male SCREAM.

After a moment, Katie returns to the room. She is covered in blood. She climbs back under the covers and prepares to go back to sleep.

A few moments later there is the sound of footsteps from the apparition as it enters the room. Katie looks toward the sound of the footsteps.

Katie’s gaze follows the footsteps as they come around to Micah’s side of the bed. The covers lift up and a form lies down under the covers. Katie lies there very still for a moment, looking at the invisible form beside her. The invisible form turns on it left side, away from her. Katie slowly moves in close to the form and then drapes her right arm around the form and snuggles up behind it.

The two of them lie quietly together. Katie rests her head on the shoulder of the form. There is a slight smile of contentment on Katie’s face; it’s over.

KATIE

(in a whisper)

Goodnight.

The tape on the recorder runs out and there is nothing but a blank screen filled with static.

BLACK OUT.

Now it’s time for a little feedback. Here are Denise’s notes:

My pick is Carlos Perez’s Version with the “Goodnight” line.

The “You Win” line [from his first entry] is creepy, but I think it felt like it was trying too hard to be creepy.  I just don’t see her character giving in so easily; granted she has been through a lot, but she does love Micah.  I don’t think she would just give up on Micah like that.

The “Goodnight” ending was pretty cool.  She knows she can’t escape this apparition and seems to really enjoy this “boyfriend” shall we say.  In a way it’s comforting to her that she has this “thing” with her at all times all through the years. Yes, it scares her, but it’s like when someone stays with someone that abuses them, at least they have someone right?  They justify it in any way they can.   I thought this was a much better ending than the original ending.

The third entry seemed to be trying too hard…this ending bothered me, I didn’t buy it, felt the writer was searching for a way to add a twist in just for the sake of a twist.  The writing was good, but I just didn’t like the content.

And my thoughts go something like this… I agree that given a choice between the two lines, I also prefer “Goodnight”. But given a broader choice, I’d rather have no line at all. Sometimes less is more, and when struggling to choose between two lines, sometimes the struggle is an indication that there’s a third, “righter” answer. Maybe it’s a third line, maybe it’s no line at all. I think it’s important to remember that “silence IS dialogue”, and nothing can be the perfect thing to say. Choosing no line here isn’t a cop out… it’s in keeping with the minimalist, naturalistic nature of the whole film… and particularly if the camera timer had fast forwarded to the credits, it could perfectly echo preceding scenes.

Nevertheless, the scene does a good job of remaining in the style of the preceding film (one of our stipulations) and setting up an opportunity for a truly creepy ending that’s far less “hollywood” than the “throw a body at the camera” version I saw.

On the more critically technical side:

  • Some of the left margin descriptive passages seem to trend a little long (best to keep them to three or four sentences) but the limitations of the scrippets formatting make that tough to judge.
  • I would like to see a less formal style to the descriptive text – there are virtually no contractions used, and the word “and” is overused, as is the phrase “there is”. It seems to retard the pacing a bit, where shorter more declarative sentences might keep the reading pace in line with the action. Find ways to collapse those thoughts into more efficient sound bites.
  • The phrase “quickly jumps” out of bed feel redundant (can one “slowly jump”?) as does “the apparition’s strength is too strong”. I’m not sure your strength can be strong.
  • I think I’d prefer “a man’s scream” to “a male scream” – it’s less clinical and easier to empathize with.
  • And lastly I’d watch for passages like “climbs back under the covers and prepares to go back to sleep” – tell us what people are doing, not what they are “preparing” to do.
  • I only found one typo!

And regarding the third entry… I also liked the writing, but found myself suddenly hung up on the viability of such a sting… is there an insurance company that pays out for “death by poltergeist”? Like the cops aren’t going to look at Katie? Unlikely… a fun twist but simply not in keeping with the preceding film (one of our stipulations).

So that’s it. Thanks for your entries, and thanks to Denise for refereeing our little contest, and for donating all the cool stuff. Carlos will receive his schwag in plenty of time for this year’s Shriekfest… congratulations again!

So did Denise make the right choice? Are my technical points off base? Weigh in if you like… that’s what this site is all about… creative dialogue between writers.

And… scene!

21
Oct

Denise Gossett signs on as new challenge referee

denise-gossett-fullWrite Club Screenplay Challenge announces new screenplay contest referee Denise Gossett.

We’re stoked to announce the referee for our second challenge, Write a New Ending for Paranormal Activity.

Denise Gossett is the founder and Director of the Shriekfest Horror and Sci Fi Film Festival, which runs in L.A. each October, and an actor. A certified Scream Queen in her own right, Denise has seen a lot of screenplays come through her festival, as well as of course having appeared in a few flicks herself: Carnies, Fright Club, The River, Decaying Orbit, Chain of Souls, Nightwatch, Sheila Takes a Bow, When Silence is Dangerous, Self Inflicted, Crustacean, and tons more!

We appreciate her making some time in her extremely busy schedule.

WHAT YOU WIN: Thanks to Denise, the lucky winner will get a Shriekfest t-shirt, a free 200 word ad in their newsletter (use it to pimp your film, your screenplay, your writing services, etc), a link on the Shriekfest site, and a free festival pass for 2010 Fest. How’s that?

16
Oct

Challenge Two – the end.

UPDATE: Winner announced!

Write Club ChallengeEXTENDED to November 31st!

** SPOILERS ** This screenplay contest assumes the entrant has seen the film Paranormal Activity, and knows how it ends. Virgins tread no further lest the cherry be popped.

Is it too soon for this?

As you may know from my review of Paranormal Activity, I’m a fan of 98% of the film. The last 3o seconds, however? Not so much.

And I’m not alone. The film has developed into quite a phenomenon, and so has the heated discussion around the supposed “studio imposed” ending. This thread at Roger Really has information about two other alleged endings, and the comments section makes for good reading on the variety of reactions to all the alternatives. Likewise the IMDB forums for the film. Or HorrorSquad.

Those who dislike the ending seem galvanized on one point: The camera lunge. I likewise am largely fine with Micah being thrown at the camera – it’s a shocker, a great exclamation point on the excruciating tension the film’s worked so hard to build to that point. But that last part, when Katie crawls in, inspects Micah’s body, and then lunges (morphed like a shot cut from Jennifer’s Body) at the camera, followed by those insipid scrolling footnotes (“…and when the teenagers got home, there was a HOOK hanging from the car door!”) just did not seem like they were from the same film, and left me and many others sitting there thinking… “That’s it? It’s over? What the Hell? This movie was different. It was good. What happened?” (Raises his arms to the ceiling and yells “Spielberrrrrrrrg!”).

So here’s the deal. I hadn’t planned on launching another challenge so soon, but the discussion this movie’s ending has generated really got me thinking… and since it’s gotten its theatrical release now, and more folks can see it, it seemed like a good time to talk about endings.

I used to work retail (who didn’t). Worked my way up to management (by mostly showing up every day). Ended up training cashiers. And here’s what I told them: No matter what the shopper’s experience is in the store, good or bad, what they’ll remember is the last interaction they had. Bad shopping experience? Offset by that nice cashier who smiled and wished you a happy day. Wonderful shopping experience? Ruined by the rude college kid who wouldn’t look you in the eye, didn’t say thank you, and smashed your tomatoes.

So too with storytelling, the ending matters. A lot. Great endings make great movies (check out this list of the top 50 endings at AMC). And bad endings become the stuff of legend (here’s Hollywood.com’s top – er, bottom – 10).

Just as your opening pages have to grab the reader (or viewer) and get them hooked, the closing pages have to leave ‘em satisfied. Just like each scene in your script should have a great button, so should your whole movie. Whether it’s a period, an exclamation point, an ellipsis or a question mark, the right ending, narratively, structurally, and psychologically puts the right closing punctuation on the story sentence.

Does that mean you’re obligated to thoroughly resolve everything? Nope. Tie everything up with a bow? Of course not (especially if you’re thinking sequel). Frankly, I like me a little ambiguity. But it’s about delivering with a style and conviction in keeping with the rest of your story. That’s what folks are complaining about with Paranormal Activity (those who are complaining anyway). That the ending doesn’t deliver on the promise of the rest of the film.

So here’s your challenge:

WRITE A NEW ENDING FOR PARANORMAL ACTIVITY.

Challenge Requirements (read carefully):

This is, we acknowledge, a particularly subjective challenge.

Consider this more than just an exercise in “endings” but also an exercise in re-writes. As a working assignment writer, you may find yourself contracted to polish or fix an existing screenplay. In this case, imagine Spielberg had asked you to “fix the ending”, keeping the balance of the existing script in mind and intact. What would you have done?

This is not about a full final act. Not even really the final scene. It’s about that critical last 30-120 seconds that justifies or validates the entire preceding 88 minutes. And it’s not really about Paranormal Activity per se, so much as it uses that film as a contemporary example to experiment with.

The (next to) final scene stands. Katie gets a strange grin on her face, and convinces Micah that it’s fine to stay in the house.

What happens next?

Everything after that (Katie leaves the room, Micah follows, and all Hell breaks loose somewhere in the dark) is up for grabs. I’ll leave it up to you whether they leave the room at all, whether you use the “Micah gets thrown at the camera” moment, whether Katie addresses the camera.

Should the film end with a bang or a boo, smash cutting to black? Is it better served with a bang and a narrative epilogue? Do we need a title crawl? Or to get out of the house to give our audience a psychological escape? Think about the characters, their personalities, their relationship, what we’ve learned about them through the story, any clues or foreshadowing or props that might be leveraged, think about what kind of a story it’s been, and find an ending that makes elegant use of all that information for a satisfying ending.

The rules:

  1. 1 scene
  2. 2 pages or less
  3. the scene should be in keeping with the balance of the film in tone, character and pace
  4. the scene should provide a satisfying conclusion to the preceding existing film
  5. proper screenplay formatting
  6. zero typos (esp. spelling, commas, and apostrophes) – including the character names!

Check our RULES page for more details.

Check out the FAQ page if you’re still confused.

HOW TO SUBMIT: Post your entry in the “comments” for this post. Use “Scrippets” tags to format your entry like a screenplay.

SUBMISSIONS LIMITED to the first 50 qualified entries (qualified = meeting the stated criteria) or 11-31-09 — whichever comes first.

WINNERS ANNOUNCED approximately two weeks after close.

COMMENTS WILL BE RESTRICTED TO ENTRIES ONLY. Other comments will be deleted (there’ll be time for comments and discussion later, promise). Contact Us if you have questions.

denise-gossettWHO’S JUDGING: Your referee will be Denise Gossett. Denise is the founder and Director of the Shriekfest Horror and Sci Fi Film Festival, which runs in L.A. each October, and an actor. A certified Scream Queen in her own right, Denise has seen a lot of screenplays come through her festival, as well as of course having appeared in a few horror flicks herself. We appreciate her making some time in her extremely busy schedule!

WHAT YOU WIN: Thanks to Denise, the lucky winner will get a Shriekfest t-shirt, a free 200 word ad in their newsletter (use it to pimp your film, your screenplay, your writing services, etc), a link on the Shriekfest site, and a free festival pass for 2010 Fest. How’s that?

Ready? Go!

— Disclaimer! This website, its operators, its sponsors and entrants have no affiliation with the film Paranormal Activity, its creators or its distributors. We make no claim to the story or characters and present this screenplay challenge only as a critical and educational tool for screenwriters, storytellers and movie fans. Paranormal Activity remains the property of Paramount Pictures Corporation and Oren Peli dba Solaka Films.

15
Oct

Screenplay Challenge One: Subtext – the results are in…

WriteClub_square

The first Write Club Screenwriting Challenge contest results announced – “Subtext”.

See the original challenge (and read the entries) here…

The envelope please…

Thanks to all those who submitted to the subtext challenge. Knowing how to avoid gratuitous exposition and on-the-nose dialogue is so critical to developing characters that have depth and motivations that resonate.

How often as a teen did you catch grief over your tone of voice? “It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it” was a common refrain in my household.

How many times has a loved one claimed that they “shouldn’t have to tell you what they want/need/mean” because you’re supposed to understand their true motivations without their spelling them out?

These are the hallmarks of subtext… the understanding that the tone and energy under the words people utter rarely carry the message they want to communicate, that their true meaning lies somewhere behind the words.

Your task was to write a scene with two characters, at least one of whom wants something from the other, at least one of whom gets what s/he wants from the other, neither of whom ever explicitly states what it is s/he wants.

Your Referee for this round is John Rainey. John has reviewed the entries, and without further ado (drum roll please) I’ll turn it over to John for his results!

AND THE WINNER IS:

ALAIN DOMINIC

All are born to their function.
A common, but durable, lineage.
Rarest breeds. All are precious, all irreplaceable.
No infection great or small must be allowed to compromise that potential.

Now, THIS is subtle subtext. Trista’s subtext is to get a position for her son in the Royal Academy. But the Queen nails her at every turn. Everything the Queen says keeps Trista in her subservient place without stating it overtly. The scene could have been even more dramatic if Trista (Wife) had continued to pursue her scene objective subtextually.  Nevertheless, excellent work! Thumbs up!

About Alain: Alain is a serious screenwriter with big aspirations and bigger ideas, who maintains a great blog at Dangerous Screenwriter. Check it out!

“Just wanted to give a big THANK YOU to all for putting on the contest in the first place, and choosing my scene as the winner! Consider this my digital hug to you all.
Websites like yours and opportunities for no-nonsense feedback really means a lot to those of us who take our craft and our careers seriously. This kind of stuff must be somewhat of a drain on your already busy schedules, so I just want you to know that your efforts to share your knowledge and inspire those of us who are really trying are appreciated and are having a great impact.” – Alain

moviestudiopp9_lAlain Dominic will receive a copy of SONY Vegas Movie Studio 9 software courtesy of The Business of Show Institute and Sony Creative Software. Congratulations, Dominic, on being the first winner of a Write Club Screenwriter’s Challenge! (Learn more about BOSI and SONY’s support for Write Club here!)

RUNNER UP:
PAM INGLESE: “I think the actions/reactions could be more subtle, and the ending was a touch melodramatic, but the scene fulfills the task [and Chip is especially fond of the fact that Lorna drives her agenda with no dialogue]. Well done!

Among the others, although they may not have specifically fulfilled the subtext task, we saw some good writing! A cute, well written scene with snappy dialogue. A powerful scene with an incredible climax that blew me away with its sense of hopelessness as reason debates rage… and loses. From the sublime to the ridiculous, you gave us the whole spectrum.

GENERAL FEEDBACK:
With an eye toward making the challenge worthwhile for all, and in the spirit of constructive criticism, I’ll share some of the common problems among the entries (not all related to subtext):

  • Double entendre was often confused with subtext. It’s not enough that the words have double meanings, but that there is an agenda behind the words. Thus there was some cute dialogue that unfortunately just didn’t fulfill the task.
  • Likewise metaphors are not subtext. They’re neat, but they’re not subtext in their own right.
  • There was a fair amount of “relationship exposition”… scenes that illustrated a complex relationship, but without subtext and no apparent resolution of an agenda.
  • Don’t forget it’s a visual medium. I’m not fond of nonspecific phrases like “uncertain what to do next”. If that’s how your character feels, try to demonstrate that through their actions in a way that lets the viewer know the character is uncertain what to do next.
  • And don’t describe your character in ways that a viewer can’t possibly know. Don’t tell me that he’s “dressed as he is every morning” or “cranky like always”. As the viewer, unless I’m familiar with his patterns I won’t know that. If it’s an important character trait, you’ll have to find an interesting visual way to communicate to the viewer that this is a behavioral pattern.
  • Watch out for passive verbs and adverbs. Don’t let your characters “walk quietly”, have them tip toe.
  • And I’m afraid I saw a few missing commas. It’s an obsession, I know.

Thank you all for your entries, and for letting me referee the first Write Club Challenge. Keep writing!

- John

john-raineyJohn Rainey – Rated the #1 screenwriting analyst in the country by Creative Screenwriting Magazine in 2003, John has been in the industry as an actor, screenwriter, reader, and analyst for more than 20 years. Learn more about John’s consulting and writing services at raineyscriptconsulting.com.

The winning entry:

EXT. ROYAL GARDENS – AFTERNOON

Trista strolls a respectful beat behind her Queen, following her lead through twisted spires and exotic, flowering orbs.

QUEEN

How fares your son?

WIFE

Spending the evening in a rejuvenation unit, but he’ll pull through. Thank you, My Lady.

QUEEN

My son respects his skill in the cockpit. He claims yours was born with wings.

WIFE

Alas, his heritage excludes him from the Royal Academy. With the right recommendations --

QUEEN

All are born to their function, even Tovarians. He’ll do fine.

WIFE

He is blessed to have a friend of such rectitude as our Prince. They’ve become virtually inseparable.

The landscape is broken by a massive, REFLECTIVE DOME STRUCTURE. Trista and the Queen arrive at a sealed entrance.

QUEEN

I hear you tend to a particularly noteworthy garden.

WIFE

My lineage is of the soil, I suspect I inherited a small amount of talent.

The Queen’s hand glides past a laser scanner and the entrance slides open. It is dark inside.

QUEEN

And your chosen seed?

WIFE

I suppose I have a reputation with J’ran Firs.

INT. GEO-DOME

Trista follows the Queen into the mouth of the sleek, shiny black tunnel.

QUEEN

We have several on the outskirts of the north lawns. A common, but durable lineage. Perhaps my lead technician could give you some instruction.

WIFE

Thank you, my Queen. It would be an honor to learn from such a renowned specialist.

Their footsteps echo through the dark chamber as they approach a curtain of RED GAS, billowing from ceiling to floor. Trista hesitates.

QUEEN

An inoculation cloud. Have you ever seen the Royal Arborium?

WIFE

That was my first time, thank you, my Lady.

QUEEN

Outside was not the Arborium.

The Queen disappears into the red mist. Trista follows.

INT. ARBORIUM

Trista emerges from the cloud into a twinkling, bioluminescent ALIEN FOREST.

It is night time here, the Geo-Dome mimicking a perfect, clear nocturne, complete with glimmering stars and constellations in its seemingly endless “sky”.

WIFE

Heaven’s Kingdoms...

QUEEN

Indeed. The plants that grow in here are of the rarest breeds from throughout the known biospheres. All are precious, all irreplaceable.

WIFE

I see.

QUEEN

Do you? All this fabrication is nothing less than a grand womb, regulating every atom enveloping us to the slightest degree. Every need is met. Every circumstance regulated, enabling every sprout to reach its fullest potential. Good men have lost lives to ensure that every blade in this forest may flourish. To me, it is the very symbol of the strength and prosperity of our entire race. No infection great or small must be allowed to compromise that potential.

WIFE

Understood, my Queen.

2
Sep

Business of Show Institute and Sony Creative Software support Write Club

BOSI and SONY ROCK!

moviestudiopp9_lWe are thrilled to announce that Marvin Acuna’s Business of Show Institute (BOSI) and Sony Creative Software are supporting our efforts to challenge the screenwriting community by providing the prize for our first challenge!

The winner of the first Write Club Screenplay Challenge on “Subtext” will receive a boxed copy of Sony Vegas Movie Studio 9 Platinum Pro Pack!

Now remember, boys and girls, Write Club doesn’t always offer prizes for our challenges but it only seems right that our inaugural launch be as celebratory as possible. So when BOSI and Sony stepped up and volunteered, we said what any smart guy is gonna say… Yes!

We are very excited to be able to offer this great prize, and can’t express enough gratitude to Marvin, BOSI and Sony for their support.

Now get out there and write!

31
Aug

Challenge One: Subtext

09/01/09 – SUBMISSIONS ARE CLOSED – See results here!

It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it.

WriteClub_squareThe gauntlet has been thrown.

John Rainey has stepped up and volunteered to referee our first challenge. It goes without saying that all of our challenges share a few requirements… among them proper format, spelling, and punctuation. Otherwise, we leave it up to each referee to define their challenge, and to decide just how stringent they plan to be on issues of compliance. We can promise you John has extremely high expectations.

JOHN’S CHALLENGE REQUIREMENTS (READ CAREFULLY):

From John’s site: “An objective is the character’s subtext in a scene. Rarely do characters say what their objective is. They speak around it in an effort to persuade the other character to give him/her what he/she wants. A guy on a date would never say ‘Let’s go to my place and have sex.’ … To say that would be ‘on-the-nose.’” …more

  1. 1 scene
  2. 3 pages or less
  3. 2 characters
  4. Strong opposing character objectives where the objective of one character must be fulfilled by the other character
  5. the objectives should be discerned only through subtext and never articulated by character through dialogue
  6. one or both objectives is/are fulfilled through implication
  7. zero typos (esp. spelling, commas, and apostrophes)
  8. your entry can function as a self-contained short or a scene from a larger story

HOW TO SUBMIT:
Post your entry in the “comments” for this post. Use “Scrippets” tags to format your entry like a screenplay.

SUBMISSIONS LIMITED to the first 25 qualified entries (qualified = meeting the stated criteria) or 09-30-09 — whichever comes first.

WINNERS ANNOUNCED approximately two weeks after close.

sony vegas movie studioWHAT YOU WIN:

  1. SONY Vegas Movie Studio 9 software courtesy of The Business of Show Institute and Sony Creative Software. (Learn more…)
  2. Bragging rights.
  3. Satisfaction.
  4. A kick in the direction of a new writing project.

That’s it. Simple, right?

Check our RULES page for details.

john-raineyJohn Rainey – Rated the #1 screenwriting analyst in the country by Creative Screenwriting Magazine in 2003, John has been in the industry as an actor, screenwriter, reader, and analyst for more than 20 years. Learn more about John’s consulting and writing services at raineyscriptconsulting.com.

17
Aug

first challenge coming soon!

We’re happy to announce that John Rainey has agreed to design and referee our first challenge!

We can’t tell you the details yet, but we can let you know that the theme is SUBTEXT.

Check back September 1st for the announcement.

And check out our about and rules pages to learn more about Write Club Screenplay Challenge.

john-raineyJohn Rainey – Rated the #1 screenwriting analyst in the country by Creative Screenwriting Magazine in 2003, John has been in the industry as an actor, screenwriter, reader, and analyst for more than 20 years. Learn more about John’s consulting and writing services at raineyscriptconsulting.com.

30
Jul

and… action!

welcome!
Write Club Screenplay Challenge is a simple little blog that sets up mini-challenges for screenwriters. It’s like one of those 48-hour filmmaker’s challenges, but you don’t have to make a whole movie. You just have to write it.

  • We establish the parameters of the challenge.
  • You submit your “entry” in the comments section below the challenge post (using “scrippets“).
  • Our referee(s) review the entries and choose a winner.
  • The winner receives the satisfaction of having won (maybe someday we’ll offer something more than that… but if you’re not writing to write, that in itself is something to think about).

We’ll be launching our first challenge soon… keep checking back. And tell your fellow screenwriters.

why?
It offers motivation to get writers to write; it allows for socializing with, and feedback from, your peers; and it’s good fun.

inspiration…
Write Club Screenplay Challenge was inspired by the John August website. Although John is a busy busy man, he occasionally finds time to offer his blog readers a “scene challenge” — wherein John sets up parameters, and invites readers to post “entries”. There have been 5 challenges on John’s site in the past 30 months. When he has another, we’ll let you know.

Write Club is an appreciative homage to the spirit of John’s site.